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20121121
20121129
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)
taxes at 15%. let's make sure that warren buffett probably starts paying not just like a secretary, a proper percentage. what has been proposed will not have warren buffett paying this percentage. let's have a flat tax. take him at his word and if you make more common you will pay more, not the only way it will happen. lou: the president himself may have been talking to you or steve forbes. >> this is a great time. not only that, let's not forget that the last time that the senate had a budget is when harry reid worked with his friend, and nobody in the 2008 budget complained that they weren't spending enough money. that cuts out a trillion in spending right there. are you concerned about the time that they had taken have taken on this first day of the discussion? >> i was not hopeful that the president's tone. [talking over each other] [talking over each other] lou: are you being partisan here? >> i am not being partisan. i am being objective when i say that the president pays 1.6 trillion in new revenues. he wants to destroy the economy. no one in their right mind is going to all
tax, 15%, gift taxes, 15%, let's make sure that warren buffett finally starts paying at least as much as his secretary, in the percentage, and, what has been proposed, here, by the president, will not have warren buffett paying the same as his secretary, in percentage. let's have a flat tax, lou. let's take the president at his word. if you make more you will pay more and this is the only way that that is going to happen. >> lou: you know, i believe the speaker boehner, perhaps the president himself may have been talking to you, talking to steve forbes and others who talked about the possibility of reforming the entire tax code. that could -- >> this is a great time. you know, the kind of time... and, not only that, let's don't forget the last time that the senate had a budget, it was when harry reid worked with his friend, speaker pelosi and nobody in the 2008 budget complained that it wasn't spending enough money. let's go back to 2008. $2.5 trillion, and cuts off a trillion in spending, right there. >> lou: there are all sorts of ways to get there, as you suggest here tonight, and,
. >> good morning. >> we've laid out some of the basics there and warren buffett was out this morning talking about taxing the wealthy. he says there should be a minimum tax on millionaires. take a listen. >> i think it would have a great effect in terms of the morale of the middle class who have seen themselves paying high payroll taxes, income taxes, and then they've watched guys like me end up paying a rate that's below that, you know, paid by the people in my office. >> you know, he was the one that in a way started all this, susan, because he talked about he shouldn't pay a lower tax rate than his secretary. now he's saying that taxes should rise, maybe for people making over $500,000 a year. a lot of republicans loved him for his business sense, but have they stopped listening to him now? >> well, and of course, if you raise the minimum tax on millionaires, i think americans would be all for that. the trouble is, it doesn't really raise you enough money, not the kind of money we're talking about. and even going down to $500,000, the reason that the level's been set at $250,000 p
had warren buffett on the show yesterday. warren buffett said raising the top marginal tax rate to 39.6% wouldn't catch any of the top income earners in america. that it would not impact them at all. now why shouldn't republicans be focusing on that, the real political battle in washington today, instead of focusing on a battle they know they're going to lose, against a woman of color after they just got shellacked in the polls among people of color and females. why are they doing this? and, andrea, a bigger question, as we go to a new congress, is john mccain going to continue to have the disproportionate impact that he has on foreign policy in the republican senate caucus? mika and i talked to so many people over the past two, three years that say we want, republican senators, we want out of afghanistan but, you know what, we just sort of stay out of john's way. how many times have we heard that? >> a lot. it's disturbing. >> we hear it all the time. they stay out of his way. are they going to blindly follow and, again, i love and respect senator mccain, but i don't want my party to
from the white house. it comes on the same day warren buffett writing in the "new york times" in an op-ed saying rich is $500,000 a year, and let's tax them. let's have a 30% minimum tax for the income above $1 million of rich people. look what he said here. the "forbes" 400, wealthiest individuals in america hit a new group record. $1.7 trillion, more than five times the $300 billion total in 1992. he says you know, my gang has done pretty well. so leave the middle class alone. and so these two kind of the 1-2 punch from the white house perspective, at least, today on what we should be doing in debt talks. >> buffett is interesting. he said he doesn't think it will be that big a deal if we go off the cliff. >> he says don't worry about raising taxes on investments and income from investments. he said, i will do a good deal, because it's a good deal. not because my taxes are going to be a certain rate. so he has pounded this -- beat this drum for some time. but this is the white house, the latest from the white house on the fiscal cliff and how it would hurt the middle class. >> christ
, warren buffett said 16.5% and it is coming in as revenue and i have heard lower. spending, it is somewhere on the range of 22%-24%. to me, that is the reality of what is happening. a decline in revenue and an increase in spending for a variety of reasons we could go through. if we're serious about deficit reduction, we often -- we have to move back. the closer we can get to an 18% level as we bring down spending, the more likely we are to have a stable economy in the years ahead. let's talk about what has happened since the time when we did have our budget in balance. the chairman of the appropriations committee of dates the figures from time to time, but let's take a look at where we are today compared to where we were in fiscal year 2001 when the government actually ran a $128 billion surplus. compared to this figure, we are spending less on non-security discretionary spending than we were then. in other words, the growth in spending has not been in the non-defense discretionary accounts. second, the cost of security programs in that same time income since we were last i
, and there are proposals, as warren buffett has, where people who make $1 million should pay 30%. host: the average tax percentage is about 10%. if you look it this chart here -- host: eric, rome, georgia. caller: i have an article here that says why congress will not tax the 1%. it tells you about the congressman. 261 are millionaires or billionaires'. the top republican, darrell issa, is worth $441 million. dick armey handed bush a budget for 10 years, and it squandered the surplus. what the article states is they will not raise taxes on the 1%. it is because they are the 1%. host: use of the number in that article is -- you said the number in that article is 261. caller: are millionaires or billionaires'. guest: the caller makes a good point, that the wealth of people in congress has diverged from the average wealth of americans, and a colleague of mine wrote an article looking at this trend, as over the last three years the average net worth of members of commerce has grown extremely well. -- congress has grown extremely well. i do not know if they are motivated by their own income. i think it is m
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)